venice florida vacation rentalsvenice florida motels
venice florida motelsvenice florida motelsvenice florida hotelsvenice florida hotelsvenice florida hotelsvenice florida hotelsvenice florida hotels

MEMBER


Venice Area Chamber


Venice Main Street


Visit Florida


Sarasota Visitors and Convention Bureau

Area Information and Things to Do



Free things to do in Venice and nearby

Venice Art Center - 485-7136
390 Nokomis Ave. S

Basketball Courts - Hecksher Park
Corner of Harbor Dr and Venice Ave West
We have a basketball in office that you can borrow during office hours

Venice Jetty - Take Venice Ave to the beach, turn right on the Esplanade and then turn right at Tarpon Center Dr and this will take you to the jetty. You can fish off the rocks, enjoy the beautiful view and often times there are proposes swimming in the area.

Beaches (see detail starting page #

Venice Municipal Beach - at the end of Granada, Venice Ave and Barcelona Ave is the free public parking lot

Casperson Beach - approx. 2 miles south on Harbor Dr – free parking available

Brohard Park - approx 2 miles south on Harbor Dr. – free parking

Fishing Pier and beach - approx 2 miles south on Harbor, behind Sharky’s Restaurant – free public parking

Nokomis Beach - North on 41, left on Albee Rd to Nokomis beach.  Free parking

Siesta Key Public Beach - north on 41 approx. 12 miles, left on Stickney Point Rd, right on Midnight Pass and stay to the left on Beach Rd.

Bicycling (see detail starting page #

Venetian Waterway Trail - see detail following

Legacy Trail - see detail following

Bird Watching
The Rookery
 (see detail starting page #

Return to the top of page


History of the Venice Area
Written by Marge Stolte

As long as humans have existed in the Americas, people have chosen to live in this Gulf Coast paradise destined to become known as Venice. Even during the last ice age, people thrived on the shores of this bountiful land. Traces of settlements from over 10,000 years ago are found as far as 100 miles offshore. Due to substantially lower sea levels at that time, the Florida peninsula was twice as wide as it is today. In an environment of vast savannas, grassland, and open prairies, the ancient Paleo people hunted long extinct animals including the mammoth, mastodon, cave bear, horse, bison, and even camel. As a result, Venice and surrounding areas are rich in history and important archaeological sites.

Over many thousands of years, the aboriginal people flourished, ultimately giving rise to the mighty, expansive Calusa Indian nation. Dominating most of South Florida, this substantial civilization thrived for innumerable generations. Evidence of their passing includes impressive canal systems, beautiful carvings, and huge mounds. Depending upon their location, mounds were constructed utilizing shell, debris, or earth, some of which can still be seen today. A 5,000 year-old mound, left by unnamed Native American people, can be observed at Historic Spanish Point in Osprey.

Ponce de Leon put the peninsula on the map in 1513, calling it La Florida, chosen in honor of landing during the Easter Feast of Flowers. He returned to a nearby island along the gulf coast in 1521 with hundreds of settlers, attempting the first European settlement in North America. The Calusa people denied the encroachment, mortally wounding the conquistador. Nonetheless, the Spanish wave continued during the 16th century. After repeated exposure to European illnesses, the large, long-enduring native population became extinct within a time span of only about 200 years. With no roads into the area, early 19th century seafaring pioneers were able to locate the small inlet to the bays by sighting a formation of trees resembling a horse and carriage. Hence, the earliest known name for the Venice area was Horse & Chaise. For a time, the first post office in the immediate area was called Eyry, intended to mean the nest of a predatory bird, actually spelled Aerie.

Without a harbor, early growth was slow until the Homestead Act, promising 160-acre land tracts, ushering in an era of new settlement. The first takers were John and Eliza Webb, settling in the Osprey area in 1867 with their five children. The Reverend Jesse Knight, his wife Rebecca, and some of their brood of fifteen quickly followed them, settling on the south side of Dona Bay. A few years later, Robert Roberts came to the south side of the bay still named after him.

Memories of Venice, Italy led settler Frank Higel to submit the name Venice for the 1888 post office in what is today the Nokomis area. In 1910, Bertha Honore Palmer’s purchase of a 140,000-acre land tract facilitated the extension of the Seaboard Airline Railroad from Fruitville to a point south of Roberts Bay. She called the terminus Venice, and had the post office relocated to the new depot. The citizens north of Roberts Bay ultimately chose another name, settling on ‘Nokomis,’ the name of Hiawatha’s grandmother.

In 1916, Dr. Fred Albee, a bone specialist from New York, purchased a considerable quantity of property from the Palmer holdings. Dr. Albee, envisioning a planned community, commissioned the well-known planner John Nolen to design the layout of the city. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (BLE), North America’s oldest rail labor union, purchased 50,000 acres from Dr. Albee in 1925. The BLE utilized the Nolan plan to build a retirement community directly on the beautiful gulf coast. The city of Venice was incorporated in 1927, with Ned Worthingon serving as the first mayor. Today, the flavor of the traditional Italian architecture originally created is readily seen throughout the city of Venice.

The four-story Woodmere Lumber Mill, founded by Herman Kluge in 1918, provided most of the lumber used in the building of Venice. Originally called Manasota, the mill employed about 1,500 people and cleared longleaf pine forests from thousands of acres of land. The 10-acre mill town was destroyed by fire and abandoned by 1930. Foundation stones from Woodmere were incorporated into the construction of the Venice Jetties in 1937.

1928 brought the first Tamiami Trail, a nine-foot wide route connecting Tampa and Miami, called The Velvet Highway, down the coast through the Venice area. Just a few years later, the end of the land boom and the economic depression brought an end to the BLE development, causing many people to leave the area. Venice, in effect, became a ghost town.

In 1932 the Kentucky Military Institute (KMI), the oldest private military school in the country, sought property for winter quarters. Their commander, Colonel C. B. Richmond, personally selected Venice for this purpose, bringing renewed economic life into the city. KMI remained a vital factor within Venice for many years, until ceasing operations in 1970. The influx of people following the establishment of the Army Air Base in 1942 substantially added to the economic stability of the Venice area. The Florida Medical Center, started by Dr. Albee in 1933, was transformed into a military hospital. Combat pilots and ground crews were trained at the base until November 1945. In 1952 an offering of 19,000 platted lots encouraged the growth of the new community of South Venice. Each 40’ x 100’ lot, requiring a minimum of two for building, sold for $200. Building began in July of 1953, and by the middle of 1954, most had been sold.

Utilizing the existing rail lines, the Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus began to winter in Venice in 1960. By 1962, the population had reached 27,000, a significant increase from the 1957 number of 10,000.


Construction of the 150-mile West Coast Inland Waterway (Intracoastal Waterway) began in 1960 as the dredge "Dauntless" carved the way at about 2 miles per month. The waterway expanded boating opportunities and created the island of Venice. The $15.5 million project was dedicated in 1967.


Venice enjoys a rich and varied heritage, only briefly touched upon here. Venice is a designated Florida MainStreet City, as awarded by the State of Florida for Historic Preservation. Many other people and events, from cattle ranchers to fishermen, from orange groves to turpentine stills and from Seminole Indians to dedicated public servants, all blend together to create the captivating city on the gulf we enjoy so much today. This is our Venice.

Return to the top of page


Parks & Beaches In the Venice Area

For the citizen or visitor wishing to spend leisure hours enjoying the sun, the greater Venice area provides one of the finest systems of public beaches. Whether your preference is a primitive beach in its natural state, or a developed beach with all of the amenities, the choice is yours.

Lifeguards at Venice Beach, North Jetty, and Nokomis Beach, as well as all other County lifeguarded beaches, are certified as either EMT's or First Responders. All beaches with lifeguards have the ability to perform the most up-to-date emergency medical treatments. Each beach location also has emergency medical treatments available such as oxygen and an Automated External Defribrillator. The lifeguarded beaches in Sarasota County became the first Beach Lifeguard agency on the west coast of Florida to become certified by the United States Lifesaving Association.

Sarasota County began a "dune restoration service" program in 1981 that is designed to work with nature and strengthen the natural balance of the beaches. In addition, a $18.7 million nourishment program was completed and the project has widened the beaches by 150 to 300 feet along a mile stretch of Gulf front from the Venice jetties to the fishing pier.

In order to thrive and grow, both the dunes and the natural vegetation must be protected from the foot traffic of thousands of people who use our beaches every year. Wooden walkovers are found at most of our beaches and provide safe and convenient access to the beaches as well as protect the new dunes from pedestrian traffic.

When you visit our beaches, help us respect and protect the natural environment by using walkovers wherever they are provided. We want many generations of visitors and residents to enjoy the wonders of our greatest natural resource for years to come. Starting at the southernmost point in the greater Venice area, you will find a beach to fit your needs.

Return to the top of page


Venice Area Beaches


Caspersen Beach

Located south of the Venice Airport on Harbor Drive. As you visit this beach, you will find that the southern two thirds of beachfront has been left in its natural state. Many people describe it as uncultivated, windswept and secluded. You will also find a nature trail and see freshwater and saltwater marshes, mangrove areas and tidal flats. It is the favorite spot for finding sharks teeth.

Brohard Beach and Service Club Park

Just north of Caspersen, you will find Brohard, a city owned park that has a 740 foot fishing pier on the property for public use. Up the road, Service Club Park offers playground equipment and boardwalks with covered picnic areas. You will also find the U.S. Coast Guard Flotilla Training Center, wetlands and several areas that are great for bird watching.

Venice Beach

At the west end of Venice Avenue, you will find Venice Beach. If you enjoy diving in your leisure time, a reef containing fossilized material is located quarter mile offshore, making it a favorite spot for divers. Its close proximity to downtown makes this a popular "walk to the beach" for residents and employees. This beach has recently been renourished.

North Jetty Beach

Located on the tip of Casey Key, the jetties make this one of the most exciting surfing beaches on the west coast of Florida. It is a very popular picnicking spot for families and large groups and the fishing is said to be spectacular. If you enjoy watching boats, this is a good place to do so as they can be seen daily passing through the Intracoastal Waterway.

Nokomis Beach

Heading west on Albee Road, you will find Sarasota's oldest public beach. This family oriented beach is also popular for fishing and includes a boat launch ramp.

Return to the top of page


Venice Area Parks

Venice Area Beautification, Inc., under the auspices of the Venice Area Chamber of Commerce, is an ongoing program responsible for enhancing eco-tourism as well as beautifying the greater Venice area.

The newest project of this group calls for a linear park along the Intracoastal Waterways offering riding and walking trails from the old Nokomis school site to the Shamrock Park Nature Center. Restoration of the historic Train Depot is yet another project involving many volunteers and Federal, State, County and City funding.

The greater Venice area offers many meticulously maintained parks with tropical flowers, foliage, palms and pines; where people can stroll or rest on benches or watch children play. Please visit one or all of our parks and enjoy the many recreational features Venice offers:

By-Pass Park
1101 Gulf Coast Boulevard
Four softball fields, tennis courts, trails, playground area

Chuck Reiter Park
250 Fort Street
Baseball fields, playground area

Higel Marine Park
1330 Tarpon Center Dr.
Boat ramp with landing area, picnic benches

Knight Trail Park
344S Rustic Rd., Nokomis
Camping, archery course, pistol and rifle range, trap and skeet

Mundy Park, Groveland St.
Basketball court, ball field, playground area

Myakka River State Park
13207 State Road 72, Sarasota (361-6511)
28,875 acres of woodland trails, nature tours, fishing spots, camping, rustic log cabins

Oscar Scherer State Park
1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey (483-59S6)
Swimming, fresh and saltwater fishing, canoeing, camping, boating, bicycling and hiking

Shamrock Park and Nature Center
3900 Shamrock Drive
Nature center, trails, rental space tennis, basketball, playground area

South Jetty Park
Tarpon Center Drive
Benches, picnic tables, jetty

Wellfield Park
1300 Ridgewood Avenue
Baseball, softball, soccer, and football fields, playground area

West Blalock Park
Nassau Street
Brick sidewalk, park benches, Venice Community Center

Woodmere Park
Jacaranda Boulevard
Recreational building, gymnasium, rental space, tennis, basketball and volleyball courts.

Return to the top of page


Saltwater Fishing Licenses and Fees

Information current as of May 2012

Recreational saltwater licenses and fees

Before purchasing a recreational saltwater fishing license or permit, please make sure you understand what qualifies as Florida residency and whether you really need a license or permit based on the exemptions.

Annual recreational fishing licenses and permits are valid for 12 months from the date of purchase or the alternate starting date if selected at the time of purchase, unless otherwise specified on the face of the license.

*If you have a resident recreational saltwater fishing license, you do not need a shoreline fishing license, because the resident recreational saltwater fishing license covers fishing from the shore, a dock, a jetty or a boat.

 

License and permit fees are nonrefundable.
 

Saltwater Fishing

How to Order

Resident Saltwater Fishing Licenses

 

Annual

Five-Year

Lifetime Licenses and Fees are listed on another web page.

 

 

Gold Sportsman's License (includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster permits)

$100.00

 

Military Gold Sportsman's License (includes Hunting, Saltwater Fishing and Freshwater Fishing licenses; and Deer, Wildlife Management Area, Archery, Muzzleloading Gun, Crossbow, Turkey and Florida Waterfowl, Snook and Lobster permits) (sold only at tax collector's office)

$20.00

 

Annual Saltwater Fishing

$17.00

$79.00

Saltwater/Freshwater Fishing Combo

$32.50

 

Saltwater/Freshwater Fishing/Hunting Combo

$48.00

 

Saltwater Shoreline License

Free

 

 

  

Nonresident Saltwater Fishing Licenses

 

 

 

Nonresident Annual Saltwater Fishing

$47.00

 

Nonresident 3-Day Saltwater Fishing

$17.00

 

Nonresident 7-Day Saltwater Fishing

$30.00

 

Non-residents using beach or haul seines for recreational purposes are required to have a commercial saltwater products license.

 

Saltwater Fishing Permits (Resident and Nonresident)
If you are not required to have a license, you are not required to buy permits (except tarpon)

 

Annual

Five-Year
Residents only

Snook Permit (required to keep snook in season even with the Shoreline license)

$10.00

$50.00

Lobster Permit

$5.00

$25.00

Tarpon Tag (available at select county tax collector offices)

$51.50

 

SHORELINE LICENSE REQUIREMENTS

1. When did the shoreline license requirement take effect?

The shoreline fishing license requirement took effect Aug. 1, 2009.

2. Who is required to have a valid shoreline fishing license with them?

Resident saltwater anglers who fish from shore or a structure affixed to shore will need a shoreline fishing license unless they have a regular saltwater fishing license, persons with disabilities fishing license, other combo license or are exempt.

3. How much does the license cost?

The license is free. However, anglers who obtain the license over the phone will pay a convenience fee of $3.33 to the vendor who provides the service, and those who obtain the license off the Internet will pay a $2.31 convenience fee.

 

4. If I have a regular saltwater fishing license, will I have to get a shoreline license too?

No. A resident regular fishing license that covers fishing from shore as well as from a vessel costs $17 and may be the best option for most anglers unless they feel certain they will fish only from shore.

5. If I wade into the water to fish, will I no longer be covered by the shoreline license?

Anglers who wade into the water are considered to be fishing from shore as long as they can stand on the bottom and do not access or leave the area by boat.

6. If I ride in a boat to a fishing spot and then fish from shore, am I still covered by the shoreline license?

No. If an angler arrives at the fishing location by boat, he must have a regular saltwater fishing license, regardless of whether he fishes from shore.

7. Do nonresident anglers qualify for the shoreline license?

No. The shoreline fishing license is available to Florida residents only. Nonresident saltwater anglers must purchase a regular nonresident saltwater fishing license at $17 for three days, $30 for seven days or $47 for one year, regardless of whether they fish from shore or a vessel. These prices include administrative fees, but handling fees are additional.

8. Is anybody exempt from the shoreline license requirement?

The new license requirement allows exemptions for residents who are age 65 or older, all children under age 16, resident disabled persons who meet certain qualifications, active duty military personnel while home on leave, and all anglers who fish from a licensed pier. In addition, the license requirement includes exemptions for resident anglers drawing food stamps, temporary cash assistance or Medicaid who have proof of identification and a benefit issuance or program identification card issued by DCFS or the Agency for Health Care Administration, and anglers who use a pole or line without a line retrieval mechanism (such as a reel) in their home counties.

9. If I fish from shore, using a cane pole, Cuban yoyo or hand line with no reel attached, do I still have to have the shoreline license?

There is an exemption for resident anglers using a pole or line, not equipped with a fishing-line-retrieval mechanism, using natural bait, and it applies to anglers who fish from shore, structures affixed to shore or vessels. This exemption applies only in the angler's home county.

10. If I fish from shore, using a cast net, crab net, dip net, some other kind of net, crab basket, trap, gig or spear, am I still covered by the license exemption for anglers who don't have a fishing-line-retrieval mechanism?

The exemption for anglers using a pole or line, not equipped with a fishing-line-retrieval mechanism, does not include anglers who use any type of gear other than hook and line. For instance, crabbers who use traps, baskets, crab nets, dip nets or landing nets will need to have a fishing license. Also, fishermen who use cast nets or other types of nets are not exempt from license requirements.

11. If I gather scallops or other shellfish by hand, am I covered by the license exemption for anglers who don't have a fishing line retrieval mechanism?

No. The exemption for anglers using a pole or line not equipped with a fishing-line-retrieval mechanism does not include those who gather shellfish or other marine animals by hand.

 

 

12. If I get a shoreline license now, can I buy a regular saltwater fishing license later if I decide to fish from a vessel or from shore using non-exempt gear?

Yes.  Anglers who have a shoreline license but need a regular saltwater fishing license can purchase a regular saltwater fishing license, even if they already have a shoreline license.

13. Why did the state pass this shoreline fishing license requirement?

At the request of the FWC, the Florida Legislature passed the shoreline fishing license requirement to head off a federal registration requirement that would have gone into effect Jan. 1, 2010, and would have had a $15 to $25 fee, beginning in 2011. The shoreline license makes Florida's resident anglers exempt from that federal fee.

14. Is there a similar shoreline license for freshwater anglers?

No.  There never was a general exemption for fishing from the shore or a structure attached to shore in freshwater, so no new license was needed. In addition, the new exemption for anglers drawing food stamps, temporary cash assistance or Medicaid applies only to resident saltwater anglers fishing from shore or a structure attached to shore and does not relate to freshwater.

16. Where can I find more information about license requirements?

More information about license and permit requirements, outdoor recreation and FWC programs is available at MyFWC.com.

17. Do I need a Snook Permit if I have a Shoreline license?

Yes, if you are not exempt and have a Saltwater Shoreline license you are required to have a Snook Permit to keep a snook in season.

Who does not need a Florida license?

Visitors do not need a recreational hunting, freshwater fishing or saltwater fishing license or a Florida waterfowl, migratory bird, deer, turkey, snook, spiny lobster, archery season, crossbow season, muzzleloading season, or management area permit or a federal duck stamp if...

§          You are a child under 16 years of age.

§          You are hunting wild hogs on private land.

Visitors do not need a saltwater fishing license or a snook or spiny lobster *permit if...

§         You fish from a for-hire vessel (guide, charter, party boat) that has a valid vessel license.

§        You fish from a vessel, the operator of which has a valid vessel license issued in the name of the operator of the vessel.

§           You are saltwater fishing during Free Fishing Days.

§            You fish for recreational purposes from a pier with a valid pier saltwater fishing license.

§             You have a valid saltwater products license.

* These exceptions do not apply to tarpon tags.


Visitors do not need a freshwater fishing license if...

§          You are fishing in a fish pond of 20 acres or less which is located entirely within the private property of its owner.  A fish pond is a man-made pond constructed for the primary purpose of fishing, entirely within the property lines of the owner and with no surface water connection to public waters.

§          You are freshwater fishing during Free Fishing Days.

§         You are fishing in a fish pond of 20 acres or more, whose owner has purchased a fish pond license at a fee of $3 per surface acre.

§          You are fishing in the St. Mary's River or Lake Seminole (but not including tributary creeks in Florida) and have a valid Georgia fishing license.

All non-resident hunters 16 years of age or older must purchase a Florida hunting license and all related permits when hunting in Florida, except when hunting wild hogs on private lands.

 

Return to the top of page


Shopping

Closest convenience store:

Beachside Food Mart –  484-7899
at the north end of the Venice Public Beach Parking lot just 3 blocks away.
225 The Esplanade N

Closest Supermarket:

Publix – 484-3346
535 Tamiami Trail S, Venice Island

Venice Farmers Market – every Saturday 8AM – Noon
Corner of Tampa and Nokomis Ave on the Island.

Closest Walmart:

 1) Corner of Jacaranda Blvd and 41 – 4150 Tamiami Trail S, Venice
Or
 2) 13140 Tamiami Trail S., Osprey (this is a much nicer Walmart and about a 10-15 minute drive, trust me, it is worth it!)

Beach stuff:

Splash – 488-6568
120 US Bypass 41 S, Venice (corner of Venice Ave East and Bypass 41)
Has everything from bathing suites to beach towels and chairs

Tervis Tumber :

These are the best insulated beverage containers EVER!  You can’t get them in many northern places!  This is an outlet location.
928 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey

Closest Mall:

Westfield Shoppingtown
Approximately 10 miles North on 41 on the right hand side of the road.  There is a movie theatre and food court here as well.  Could be a good rainy day destination.

Closest outlet mall:

Prime Outlets, Ellenton
Take 75 north approx. 31 miles to exit 224.

Closest Flea Market: 

Dome Flea Market – 493-6773
5115 SR776, Venice

Return to the top of page


Venice Area Audubon Rookery

The VAAS Rookery is one of Venice, Florida’s best kept secrets. Those who discover this treasure understand the reason why. Photographers and birders from near and far come to the rookery to enjoy and photograph nesting birds during January, February and March. Although these months are the busiest time of the year, the rookery has visitors all year around. The rookery is on a small island in a very small lake. Even at that, during nesting time it is quite crowded with Great Blue Heron and Great Egrets and some Anhingas and Night Herons. The best time to photograph is early in the morning or late in the afternoon. The best vantage point late in the afternoon is the path to the left of the pavilion.  

Directions to the VAAS Rookery

From the North, take US 41 (Tamiami Trail) south 1/2 mile past Rt. 776. Turn right onto Annex Road at the Anderson Sarasota County Administration/Court House building. Follow Annex Road to rookery on right.

Return to the top of page


Venice Area Beautification Bike Trail
941-207-8224

Click here for more information

Return to the top of page


Venetian Waterway Park & Trail

Click here for more information

Return to the top of page


Venice Area Attractions

 

 

 

Historic Spanish Point

Address:

 

337 N. Tamiami Trail, Osprey

Phone:

 

(941) 966-5214

Website:

 

http://www.historicspanishpoint.org

 

 

 

Mote Marine

Address:

 

1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy, SRQ

Phone:

 

(941) 388-4441

Website:

 

http://www.mote.org

 

 

 

The Springs International Spa (Mineral Hot Springs)

Address:

 

12200 San Servando Ave., N. Port

Phone:

 

(941) 426-1692

 

 

 

The Venice Community Center

Address:

 

326 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice

Phone:

 

(941) 486-2311

 

 

 

The Venice Symphony

Phone:

 

(941) 488-1010

Website:

 

http://www.thevenicesymphony.org

 

 

 

Venetian Waterway Park

Phone:

 

(941) 488-2821

Website:

 

http://www.vabi.org

 

 

 

Venice Archives & Area Historical Collection

Address:

 

351 S. Nassau St., Venice

Phone:

 

(941) 486-2487

Website:

 

http://www.sunnewspapers.net/?c=9

 

 

 

Venice Area Audubon Rookery

Address:

 

End of Annex Road, off of US 41

Website:

 

http://www.veniceaudubon.org

 

 

 

Venice Art Center

Address:

 

390 South Nokomis Ave., Venice

Phone:

 

(941) 485-7136

Website:

 

http://www.veniceartcenter.com

 

 

 

Venice Theatre

Address:

 

140 W. Tampa Ave., Venice

Phone:

 

(941) 488-1115

Website:

 

http://www.venicestage.com

 

 

 

 

 Attractions Near the Venice Area

MinimizeSyndicate   Print  

 

 

 

South Florida Museum

Location:

 

Bradenton

From Venice:

 

1 hour

Website:

 

http://www.SouthFloridaMuseum.org

 

 

 

The Florida Aquarium

Location:

 

Tampa

From Venice:

 

1.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.flaquarium.org

 

 

 

Lowry Park Zoo

Location:

 

Tampa

From Venice:

 

1.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.LowryParkZoo.com

 

 

 

Busch Gardens

Location:

 

Tampa

From Venice:

 

1.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.BuschGardens.com

 

 

 

MOSI Tampa

Location:

 

Tampa

From Venice:

 

1.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.MOSI.org

 

 

 

Florida State Fair

Location:

 

Tampa

From Venice:

 

1.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.FloridaStateFair.com

 

 

 

Fantasy of Flight

Location:

 

Polk City

From Venice:

 

2 hours

Website:

 

http://www.FantasyOfFlight.com

 

 

 

Salvador Dali Museum

Location:

 

St. Petersburg

From Venice:

 

2 hours

Website:

 

http://www.SalvarodDaliMuseum.org

 

 

 

Bok Tower Gardens

Location:

 

Lake Wales

From Venice:

 

2 hours

Website:

 

http://www.BokTower.org

 

 

 

Walt Disney World

Location:

 

Orlando

From Venice:

 

3 hours

Website:

 

http://www.Disney.com

 

 

 

SeaWorld

Location:

 

Orlando

From Venice:

 

3 hours

Website:

 

http://www.SeaWorld.com

 

 

 

 Universal Studios

Location:

 

Orlando

From Venice:

 

3 hours

Website:

 

http://www.UniversalStudios.com

 

 

 

Gatorland

Location:

 

Orlando

From Venice:

 

3 hours

Website:

 

http://www.Gatorland.com

 

 

 

Kennedy Space Center

Location:

 

Cape Caneveral

From Venice:

 

3.5 hours

Website:

 

http://www.KennedySpaceCenter.com

 

 

 

Selby Botanical Gardens

Location:

 

Sarasota

From Venice:

 

45 minutes

Website:

 

http://www.Selby.org

 

 

 

Sarasota Jungle Gardens

Location:

 

Sarasota

From Venice:

 

45 minutes

Website:

 

http://www.SarasotaJungleGardens.com

 

 

 

Ringling Museum of Art

Location:

 

Sarasota

From Venice:

 

45 minutes

Website:

 

http://www.Ringling.org

 

Return to the top of page


Water Activities

Fishing License
See detailed page #

Fishing License Fees:
Nonresident, 1 year           $47
Nonresident, 7 days           $30
Nonresident, 3 days           $17

Places you can go to obtain a fishing license nearby:
 
Current as of 3/1/2010
-K-MART #3249 941-493-3213 1687 41 BY-PASS S VENICE
-NORTH JETTY FISH CAMP INC 941-488-2408 1000 S CASEY KEY RD NOKOMIS
-WAL MART #5264 941-918-1247 13140 S TAMIAMI TR OSPREY
-WAL MART #769 941-497-2523 4150 S TAMIAMI TR VENICE

Call to obtain a license
Dial toll-free, either
 888-HUNT-FLORIDA (486-8356) or 888-FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356) from anywhere in the United States or Canada.  (A $3.25 + 2.5% surcharge of total sale per person will be added to your purchase

Bait Shops 

H2Only – 488-8229
121 N. Tamiami Trail, Nokomis

Mahi Macs – 615-7485
11011 Tamiami Trail, Venice

Venice Municipal Fishing Pier
Behind Sharky’s Restaurant, 2 miles south on Harbor Dr on Venice Island

Gulf Harbor Marina – 488-7734
100 Circuit Rd.

North Jetty Fish Camp
41 south, left on Albee Rd, left on Casey Key to the end where the jetty park is located.

Fishing Guides

Captain Jamie Allen – 628-9031
Shallow water guide – fly and light tackle

Captain Les Hill – 743-6622
Light tackle & saltwater fly fishing

Deep Sea Fishing Charters

Legacy Offshore Saltwater Deep Sea Fishing Charter – 473-4603
At Crow’s Nest Marina

Playin’ Hookey Fishing Charters – 780-5237
Inshore and near shore

Hot Pursuit Charters – 993-7897
Captain Dave Pinkham’s Fishing Charter
– 473-4603

Get N Some Charters – 232-6741
Captain Dave’s
– 276-6987

Flying Fish Fleet – 366-3373
(this is out of Marina Jack’s up in Sarasota.  They have smaller boats and a large boat that takes out lots of people and supplies everything you need..great for families)

Scuba Diving Charters

Aristikat Charters – Capt. Jamie– 321-0852
You meet at the boat launch just down Venice Ave.

Megaladon Charter – 483-3483
At Fishermans’s Wharf, just over the north drawbridge

Scuba Rental / classes

Florida West Scuba – 486-1400
At Fisherman’s Wharf, just over the north drawbridge

Parasailing

Venice Parasiling and Boat Tours – 961-2041
Located at Crow’s Nest Marina

Return to the top of page


Click here or on the image below to view
a Great Dine Video


 

501 W. Venice Avenue
Venice, Florida 34285-2011

941-488-1580

Toll Free: 1-800-542-3404

VeniceBeachVillas@yahoo.com
 

Home Photos
Grounds
Rooms
Photos
Attractions
Beaches
Local Links
Activities
Restaurants
Directions
Rates &
Reservations
Testimonials Location Contact Us

© Copyright Venice Beach Villas – All rights reserved.
This site designed, hosted and maintained by
ParrComm Internet Solutions